Criminal Defense

A Criminal Defense Lawyer in Glastonbury, CT

Crimes are classified as either misdemeanors or felonies.

Like all states, Connecticut divides crimes into misdemeanors and felonies. Misdemeanors are less serious crimes, punishable in Connecticut by one year or less in jail. A felony is an offense for which a person may be sentenced to a term of imprisonment in excess of one year. Felonies and misdemeanors are classified according to the relative seriousness of the offense. Both types of criminal offenses are serious matters, but the average person is more likely to be charged with a misdemeanor than with a felony. It is important to seek legal advice if you are ever charged with any crime.  Below, our Glastonbury criminal defense lawyer breaks down misdemeanor and felony crimes along with their penalties to help you to understand what is at stake.

Misdemeanors

Class A Misdemeanors

Class A misdemeanors are the most serious misdemeanors. They are punishable by a prison term of up to one (1) year and/or a fine of up to $2,000. Crimes as diverse as prostitution and issuing a bad check worth $500 to $1,000 are examples of class A misdemeanors.

Class B Misdemeanors

A class B misdemeanor is punishable by a prison term of up to six months and/or a fine of up to $1,000. Unlawful assembly, cheating while gambling, and indecent exposure are examples of class B misdemeanors.

Class C Misdemeanors

A class C misdemeanor is punishable by a prison term of up to three months and/or a fine of up to $500. Disorderly conduct and theft of property worth $500 or less are examples of class C misdemeanors.

Class D Misdemeanors

Class D misdemeanors are the least serious misdemeanors in Connecticut, punishable by a prison term of up to 30 days and/or a fine of up to $250. Running a bingo game without a permit is an example of a class D misdemeanor.

Unclassified Misdemeanors

There are a number of misdemeanors that are not designated by statute as any of the above classes. Those unclassified crimes are punishable by a prison term and/or monetary fine in accordance with the sentence specified in the section of the general statutes that defines or provides the penalty for the crime.

Aggravating Factors

These are circumstances or behaviors during the crime that are considered more dangerous. Many Class A misdemeanors can become aggravated, which elevates them to felonies. For example, persistent offenders can have Class A misdemeanors punished as Class D felonies.

Felonies

Capital Felonies

A capital felony is punishable by life imprisonment without the possibility of release. Murder with special circumstances is considered a capital felony.

Class A Felonies

After murder, class A felonies are the most serious crimes in Connecticut. A class A felony is punishable by a prison term of ten to 50 years or 25 years to life imprisonment and a fine of up to $20,000. Kidnapping, home invasion, and sexual assault of a child under the age of 12 are examples of class A felonies.

Class B Felonies

A class B felony is punishable by a prison term of one to 40 years and a fine of up to $15,000. Robbery, promoting prostitution, and theft of property or services worth more than $20,000 are examples of class B felonies.

Class C Felonies

A class C felony is punishable by a prison term of one to ten years and a fine of up to $10,000. Bribery, misrepresenting one’s age in order to entice a child, and theft of a firearm are examples of class C felonies.

Class D Felonies

A class D felony is the least serious type of felony in Connecticut, punishable by a prison term of one to five years and a fine of up to $5,000. Issuing a bad check (over $2,000), misconduct with a vehicle, and promoting (advancing or profiting from) prostitution are examples of class D felonies.

Unclassified Felonies

There are a number of felonies that are not designated by statute as any of the above classes. Those unclassified crimes are punishable by a prison term and/or monetary fine in accordance with the sentence specified in the section of the general statutes that defines or provides the penalty for the crime.

Persistent Offenders

A persistent serious felony offender is a person who (1) stands convicted of a felony, and (2) has been, prior to the commission of the present felony, convicted of and imprisoned under an imposed term of more than one year or of death, in this state or in any other state or in a federal correctional institution, for a crime. People who have prior felony convictions may receive longer prison sentences than first time offenders, even when the two people are convicted of the same offense.

Accomplices, Criminal Attempt, & Conspiracy to Commit Crime

In addition to the crimes listed above, Connecticut punishes attempting or conspiring to commit any of them or acting as an accomplice to one of them.

Attempt or conspiracy is a crime of the same grade and degree as the most serious offense which is attempted or is an object of the conspiracy, except that an attempt or conspiracy to commit a class A felony is a class B felony. If someone is convicted of attempt or conspiracy to commit a crime, other than a class A felony, that carries a mandatory minimum sentence, the offender would be subject to that mandatory minimum sentence. State v. Moran, 264 Conn. 593 (2003).

Someone is an accomplice or is criminally liable for the acts of another if he or she acts with the mental state required to commit a crime and solicits, requests, commands, or intentionally aids another to engage in criminal conduct. These offenders can be punished as if they were the principal offenders. It also appears that someone who is an accomplice to a crime that is punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence would be subject to that mandatory minimum.

Contact Our Glastonbury Criminal Defense Attorney

The overview provided here is to assist you in understanding the hierarchy of crimes in Connecticut. This understanding can lead you to get help when you need it. If you’re unsure of where you stand in regards to a criminal charge, an experienced defense attorney can make all the difference.  Contact us immediately if you have been charged with a crime.  To schedule a consultation, click here.

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